Acute Communicable Disease Control


Contact Information
County of Los Angeles
Department of Public Health
Acute Communicable Disease Control
313 N. Figueroa Street, #212
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Phone: (213) 240-7941
Fax: (213) 482-4856
Email:acdc2@ph.lacounty.gov
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Acute Communicable Disease Control
Coccidioidomycosis (coc·cid·i·oi·do·myco·sis) also known as Valley Fever

Valley Fever: Diagnosis, Assessment and Management

Presentations will provide current facts and statistics on Coccidioidomycosis ─ cocci or Valley Fever ─ provided by physicians active in the diagnosis, treatments and surveillance of the disease.

WHEN
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 from 5:00 to 8:00 PM (PDT)

WHERE
Community Resource Center (City of Hope
─ AV Auditorium) 44151 15th Street West

Registration is free!  Earn 2 CME/CEU

Register Now!




Coccidioidomycosis, or Valley Fever, is a common fungal disease transmitted through the inhalation of Coccidioides immitis spores that are carried in dust. Environmental conditions conducive to an increased occurrence of coccidioidomycosis are as follows: arid to semi-arid regions, dust storms, lower altitude, hotter summers, warmer winters, and sandy, alkaline soils. It is endemic in the southwestern US and parts of Mexico and South America. Southern California is a known endemic area. 

Many infected individuals exhibit no symptoms or have a mild respiratory illness, but some individuals develop a severe illness such as pneumonia, meningitis, or dissemination when the fungus spreads to many parts of the body. Because of the wide range of clinical presentations, only the most severe cases are usually reported to the health department. Laboratory diagnosis is made by demonstrating the fungus with microscopic examination or culture or by serologic testing. Blacks, Latinos, Native Americans, Filipinos, males, pregnant women, the very young (<5 years), elderly, and immunocompromised individuals are at high risk for severe disease.


Additional Resources
WEBINAR
Medscape Webinar
with Free CME


Valley Fever:
Timely Diagnosis, Early Assessment, and Proper Management


Webinar for primary care physicians and nurses
Valley Fever
Youth Flyer
(English)  (Spanish)
Valley Fever
Frequently Asked Questions
(English) (Spanish)
Valley Fever Stickers
Order Form
Valley Fever Bookmarkers
(English/Spanish)
Order Form
Valley Fever
Antelope Valley Flyer
(English) (Spanish)
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