image of lacounty.gov url County Directory of Information & Services | Public Alerts | Public Information | County Contact Information
Image of LA County logo

Office of Health Assessment and Epidemiology
Policy Analysis Unit
image of los angeles county

    

Policy Analysis Unit


Contact Information
Policy Analysis Unit
Office of Health Assessment and Epidemiology
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

313 N. Figueroa St., Room 127
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Phone: (213) 240-7785
Fax: (213) 250-2594
Email: pau@ph.lacounty.gov
Image of Adobe Reader Icon

Adobe Reader
Note: PDF documents on this site were created using Adobe Acrobat 5.0 or later. If you are using an earlier version of Adobe Acrobat Reader (4.x or less), document functionality may be reduced.

Please Click Here
Highlighted Reports

Health Impact Assessment: Measure H

Front page of toolkit  Health Impacts of Measure H: Preventing and Reducing Homelessness in Los Angeles County

This HIA assesses the housing and health impacts of Measure H, a ¼ cent sales tax initiative to fund homelessness services in LA County. We apply a public health lens to the Measure by organizing its various strategies according to three key populations at risk of homelessness and currently homeless. The HIA synthesizes research evidence for the housing and health impacts of Measure H strategies and provides recommendation for how to maximize these impacts through implementation, if the measure passes.


Report: View   pdf of full report

Health Impact Assessment: Measure JJJ

Front page of toolkit  Health Impacts of Initiative Ordinance JJJ: Affordable and Transit-Oriented Housing Policies for the City of Los Angeles

This HIA estimates the effects of Measure JJJ on affordable housing production and then examines the health impacts of affordable housing through decreases in rent burden, overcrowding and displacement, and increases in household proximity to transit, neighborhood integration and housing quality. The HIA offers recommendations that speak to the public health implications of affordable housing policies in general and suggest ways that the potential health benefits of Measure JJJ could be considered during the implementation process, if it passes.


Report: Brief | Full | Summary (Spanish)   pdf of full report


Projected Long-Term Health Impacts of Proposition 56 on the Los Angeles County Adult Population

Front page image of report “The California Tobacco Tax for Healthcare, Research, and Prevention Act of 2016 (Proposition 56): Projected Long-Term Health Impacts on the Los Angeles County Adult Population.”
This was a collaboration with Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention, with support from the University of Southern California Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & Economics. 


This report describes an analysis of the long-term health impact of Proposition 56, The California Tobacco Tax for Healthcare, Research, and Prevention Act of 2016. The report was done by staff in the Office of Health Assessment and Epidemiology and the Division of Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention, with support from the University of Southern California Schaeffer Center for Health Policy & Economics. The findings suggest that the tobacco tax specified in Proposition 56, if adopted and implemented, would result in significant reductions in new cases of heart disease, stroke, chronic lung disease, and cancer in the Los Angeles County adult population over the next four decades.  For more information about the design, methodology and results click the link below.

Click here to download full report PDF of full report

Rapid Health Impact Assessment Toolkit

Front page of toolkit  Guidance and Tools for Conducting Rapid Health Impact Assessments: Applying a Health Lens to Policy and Program Decisions in Los Angeles County. Version 1.0

The Health Impact Evaluation Center at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (LACDPH), developed a Rapid Health Impact Assessment Toolkit to assist LACDPH staff, other local health agencies, and staff of agencies outside of the health sector with guidance on when and how to conduct a 4-6 month HIA. This document describes the  six steps of the HIA process adapted to fit a more rapid time frame. We've also developed a series of attachments to assist HIA practitioners when they are conducting their RHIA, which include: 1) How to prioritize and screen whether or not a RHIA should be conducted 2) Tips and guidance for conducting a RHIA 3) Examples of pathway diagrams and policy briefs 4) Available data sources for conducting a HIAs  5) Effective stakeholder engagement methods 6) Databases for conducting literature reviews and 7) Methods for tracking impact and outcome indicators.
 


Click here to download Full Report  pdf of full report

Rapid Health Impact Assessment: Second Chance Women's Re-Entry Court

Front page of HIA 
Health and Public Safety Impacts of Sustaining a Women's Jail Diversion Program in Los Angeles County: A Rapid Health Impact Assessment
This was a collaboration with Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office, Public Defender, Department of Probation, Superior Court, Prototypes, County Criminal Justice Coordination Committee and DPH's Substance Abuse and Prevention Control Program.

The Health Impact Evaluation Center at the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, conducted a Rapid Health Impact Assessment to assess the impacts of a jail diversion program called Second Chance Women's Re-Entry Court. Women in the criminal justice system often suffer from mental health problems, chronic drug and alcohol addictions, and trauma histories. Diversion programs present an opportunity to address the complex needs of these women without some of the negative consequences associated with incarceration. This rapid HIA seeks to synthesize available data to assess the program’s impact on a variety of relevant outcomes, including recidivism, economic benefits of jail years saved, mental health, substance use, relationships, employment and housing stability among women charged with lower-level felonies (non-serious, non-violent, non-sex offender crimes). To access the full report and Executive Summary, please click on the links below. 

Click here to download Full Report  pdf of full report
Click here to download Executive Summary  pdf of full report

Maternal Child and Adolescent Health Funding:

Front page image of report Health Impact of Changes in Funding Allocations to Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Programs:
This was a collaboration with Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health.

Title V and State General Fund (SGF) allocations to California's Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health (MCAH) programs decreased significantly between 2000 and 2010. The objective of this study was to quantify how these funding changes have affected health outcomes. More specifically, we focused on low birth weight (LBW), infant mortality (IM), and births to teen mothers (BTM). We found that lower funding was associated with worse outcomes, even for IM and BTM, which have improved in recent years in the state, suggesting that MCAH funding reductions partially explain the recent increase in LBW rates and that IM and BTM rates could have improved even more in the absence of these funding reductions. Using the results of this analysis, we projected the potential impact of restoring funding to its peak level in 2001. For additional details on this study's methodology and findings, click the link below.

Click here to download issue brief  pdf of full report

  Parks After Dark Health Impact Assessment:

Front page image of report Potential Costs and Health Benefits of Parks After Dark:
This was a collaboration with the Division of Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention and the Health Impact Evaluation Center
.

In collaboration with the Division of Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention (CDIP) and the Health Impact Evaluation Center, we conducted a rapid health impact assessment (HIA) of the Los Angeles County Parks After Dark (PAD) program. PAD, initially a violence prevention strategy of County's Gang Violence Reduction Initiative at three parks, has evolved into a cross-sector collaboration offering a gamut of recreational programs, cultural and educational activities, youth leadership opportunities, and health services. The objective of this HIA was to inform decision making by examining three alternative planning options: 1) continue PAD programming as is, 2) expand PAD to include additional parks, or 3) discontinue PAD. The rapid HIA made 9 overall recommendations to maximize potential health benefits of PAD.


Click here to download issue brief PDf of full report

The Potential Costs and Benefits of Providing Free Public Transportation Passes to Students:

Front page image of report The Potential Costs and Benefits of Providing Free Public Transportation Passes to Students in Los Angeles County:
This was a collaboration with Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention, who led the project.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (DPH) conducted a rapid assessment of the costs and benefits of providing free transit passes for all students from preschool to college, regardless of income.  To inform decision making, DPH focused it's assessment on the program's costs and benefits, identified priorities by key stakeholders and decision-makers in the community. The Policy Analysis Unit, assisted CDIP, with the cost calculations. For detailed information about potential costs, conclusions and recommendations click the link below.




Click here to download full report pdf of full report


  Cost Analysis of Shared Use Agreements in Los Angeles County:

Front page image of report Impact of Shared-Use Agreement Adoption on School District Expenditures in Los Angeles County:
This was a collaboration with Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention. 


This study was one of three components led by CDIP, PAU attempted to estimate the impact of shared-use agreement (SUA) adoption on school districts expenditures. Shared-Use Agreements allow community members access school facilities outside regular school hours. We compiled a dataset of SUA adoptions over the period of 2005-2012 by school districts in Los Angeles County (LAC), focusing on SUAs that allowed the use of facilities for physical activity, and used California's Standardized Account Code Structure (SACS) data to track several types of district level expenditures over the same period. The results of this study showed that each additional school with a SUA was associated with $15,500 higher community services expenditures (p<.001) and $58,900 higher enterprise expenditures (p=0.10).  For more information about the design, methodology and results click the link below.

Click here to download full report PDF of full report
 
 
Home  |
Policy Analysis Unit
Public Health
LA County
  Careers  |   DPH Programs  |   Email: Webmaster  | Notice of Privacy Practices | 
English
Spanish
  Website Privacy Policy  |   Language  |   Accessibility  |   Disclaimer |   Employee  |
Admin Use
Outlook E-mail
DPH Intranet (At Work)
 
Los Angeles County Seal: Enriching lives through effective and caring services