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Coronavirus Disease 2019

Building an Infection Prevention Program
Information for the Infection Preventionst


Become and maintain training as an IP
Steps to build your IP Program
1. Essential Components of your IPP

Use an IP Orientation Checklist to standardize essential components of an IP program and ensure consistency: IP Orientation Checklist

2. Assess the strengths and areas for improvement

Below are some tools to assess your facility’s IP Program:

CDC ICAR Assessment-General Infection Prevention, available in English and Spanish

COVID-Specific: 

3. Risk Assessment

Use the Infection Prevention Post-Acute Risk Assessment Prioritization Worksheet to help your facility prioritize and determine where to start focusing your IP efforts.

4. Develop an Action Plan

Areas of concern identified through your risk assessment in Step 3 will allow you to next work to:

  • Identify strategies and best practices to be put into place
  • Determine who is responsible for that work
  • Establish a timeline for completion
  • Evaluate effectiveness of those efforts through surveillance
  • Gather feedback from frontline staff (RN, LVN, CNA), DON/ADON, DSD, Admin, Providers on your plan

See Example Modifiable Action Plan Templates: Generic 1-page templates | COVID-19 template

5. Implement your action plan

Keys to successfully implementing your action plan include:

  • Educating all stakeholders, including facility leadership, regarding expectations
  • Empowering staff to speak up
  • Engaging staff members, providers, and residents in the process
  • Modifying your action plan as necessary.
6. Measures to Evaluate Your Plan

Evaluate your plan by conducting surveillance: This allows your facility to analyze key data to determine effectiveness. There are two key components of surveillance: process measures and outcome measures.

Process measures

Process measures are important in quality improvement as they describe whether or not a strategy or intervention has been ‘properly performed’ or if we are ‘doing the things we say we should do’. From an improvement perspective, they make the important connection between behavioral changes and outcomes.

Examples of process measures include the following adherence Monitoring Tools:

HSAG Tool

CDPH Tools

Outcome measures

Examples of outcome measures are the data that gets reported and reflect the impact or end result of the health care service, strategy, or intervention on the health status of patients. While outcome measures may be seen as a key method of measuring quality, an outcome is truly the result of numerous factors, many of which may be beyond providers’ control.

Resources include:

Revised McGeer Criteria checklists 

NHSN Resources

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  • Public Health has made reasonable efforts to provide accurate translation. However, no computerized translation is perfect and is not intended to replace traditional translation methods. If questions arise concerning the accuracy of the information, please refer to the English edition of the website, which is the official version.

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